• Mark Haysom

Picking Your Wedding Day Photographer

Updated: Jun 15


Wedding photographers can get booked up two years in advance sometimes even further out than that if a couple really wants one particular photographer because of their unique style, for example. As a general rule once you have selected your venue and date that’s a good time to also secure your photography services for your Big Day.


When picking your photographer it’s not only important that you like their particular style but also that you all get along. Let’s face it they are going to be sharing your Big Day from start to very nearly the finish so getting along is a must and will certainly help throughout the day. With this in mind, I would always recommend you meet up with a few photographers that photograph in the style you both enjoy, have a good chat, explain how your wedding day will unfold and any particular requirements you have along the way, such as particular shots or poses. It’s worth also listening to any advice the photographer might recommend after all the chances are they have attended many weddings and know what really works and looks good.

Take the opportunity to look over some of their full day wedding coverage especially different times though out the year to see how they handle the various lighting situations and what the unpredictable UK weather can through at your Big Day.


Often we hear various concerns from the Bride to be, these generally stem from them attending another wedding as a guest where the photographer has acted in a way the Bride would feel uncomfortable with on her own wedding day, if that’s the case let your photographer know, they will take this all on board, after all, it’s your Big Day and needs to be right for you both.


Another area your photographer should be made aware of in advance is dealing with the meeting and directing family members. Perhaps your parents are divorced and don’t get along or you require a particular photograph made up from various family members for your Grandmother who is unable to attend, always let your photographer know. I would just add one little point here from many years covering weddings, everyone attending is there to celebrate your Big Day with you, not spoil it and I have always found everyone to be most supportive throughout the day.

If you have a schedule or timeline please share it with the photographer and provide updates should this change as the wedding day approaches. Most of us like surprises but as a photographer, I would really like to know in advance, for example, if you have planned something special for the Bride that’s going to happen out of know where I need to know. The reason is simple, I am there to capture all the wonderful magical moments throughout the day I really don’t want to miss any and be prepared in case the scene demands a different approach when taking the shot.


It would be remiss of me not to mention group shots if you intend on having them, most weddings do. The photographer will need a list in advance and also a member of the wedding party who can help identify the people required for the next shot, after all the chances are I will not know Uncle Bob from Uncle Pete, you get the idea here. In addition whilst you can have as many group shots as you like I would recommend keeping the number small. There are a good few reasons for this, each shot will take time to set up, Uncle Bob might have wandered off to talk to a family member he has not seen for ages or Aunt Flow has just popped of to do her makeup. These little things add up and whilst your guests wait some will soon start to feel the time drag and start to lose interest. As a general rule 6 to 10 group shots seem to work out the best.

In closing don’t go cheap regarding your wedding photography, cutting corners on something that will remain long after the wedding day is over seems crazy, right? Established wedding photographers are worth the money, it’s their job, their trade, their passion, and art. You can’t re-do the day and it has probably cost a small fortune, so have it documented and captured in a style that will last for many years to come.



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